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I just finished reading SpoonFed a few days ago and really loved it. Its by Kim Severson who now writes a food column in the New York Times. There was one section of the book that totally blew my mind though and it was all about GOD. Thats right G O D… check it out here

“I don’t tell many people I do this, especially the food people who make up the bulk of my professional life. Most of the food people I’ve known tend to get uncomfortable if you start talking about God and prayer unless you do it with irony or nostalgia. I know I used to. You might even be getting itchy right now.”

Since I started making a living writing about people who grow and cook food, I’ve been invited to say grace- or even just pause for a minute to thank something bigger than us-maybe a dozen times before we all started eating.  That’s out of thousands of professional meals, and not counting Thanksgiving or Seder or dinner at my mothers house. But if you think about it, cooking and eating  require the most consistent daily acts of faith of any activity, short of going to sleep and believing that you’ll wake up in the morning.

Each meal contains a thousand little divine mysteries. Who figured out that some  beets should  be golden, some red and others colored like candy canes? What blessed entity invented sugar and cocoa pods and vanilla beans or figured out that salt can preserve and brighten anything? What are we to make of a hundred little lettuces and gnarled apples with so many names you can’t remember them all? Who created melons and pork fat and peanuts, for crying out loud? And what of the miracle that is cheese?

Things get more mysteriously divine if you start to think about baking. Or how oil and garlic and egg yolk can make a glimmering, thick aiolo. Mixing hot stock into a cold roux so it won’t make lumps or mixing cake ingredients in the right order -butter and sugar together first, then eggs, then an alternating mix of flour and milk- are but town of the grand mysteries of the kitchen that we blindly believe in. And we believe because someone told us the recipes would work. An so, on faith, we tried the,. And once we tried them, and we saw that they worked, we became believers even though we had no idea how they worked. We spread the word to others who then tried them on faith, too. They became believers. Entire culinary cultures have been built on this kind of faith and trust.

Maybe you want to argue that all of the magic of the kitchen can be explained away in the cold scientific light of day. It isn’t God but yeast that makes bread rise. A properly braised short rib is the result of a predictable release of collagen in heated connective tissue, not some deity that believes a sticky, glistening sauce can teach us about the beauty of the human condition.

That my friends is food writing at is best! I will post the rest of this in the next coming days!

I mean the color…..

The texture

Mike Perry has put together 2 fantastic design books that I highly recommend

Hand Job: A Catalog of Type



Over and Over: A Catalog of Hand-Drawn Patterns

You won’t be disappointed if you add this to your bookshelf!

My Fav astrology site!

Here is the link to my fav astrologer who gives out out the most magically written horoscopes once a week!

Free Will Astrology

Where do I start with my love of feathers? I have feather earings, headbands, its just feathers galore over on Oak St. There are vases around my house that have feathers coming out of them and framed feathers. Why my nickname has even been known to be Featherhead in some circles.  There is something very romantic and historic to me about feathers and their colors are always so vibrant and rich. Also when a bird loses its feather it is a time for re-growth and regeneration, something new sprouts up to replace the old lost feather. Do you heart feathers as well?